Shipping News

The evening’s modest goal: A cauldron.

After all the wild and wooly misadventures of late, I thought I’d have a quiet evening working on the farm Unna and I have been building. Our carrot production was ramping up so we’d soon have enough to feed captive boars, replant and use to make Carrot Soup to add some all important diversity to our Valheim diet.

Carrot Soup requires a cauldron and a cauldron requires Tin. Tin can only be found in the Black Forest, often near the shore, so that shouldn’t be too hard. I was also looking for more Fine Wood which comes from Oak and Birch trees. Some of those should be in the Black Forest as well. As far as I can tell, there are no Oak or Birch “seeds” in game yet, so they cannot be farmed yet.

Fair enough, I’ll go get some Tin and along the way collect whatever Fine Wood I could find along with any Raspberries, Blueberries or Mushrooms I mind find too. Because Tin is usually near the coast, I’ll take the Karve which has 4 modest storage slots.

Of course, if I’m going to be mining in the Black Forest, I might as well plan for collecting Copper too, if I find it. Bronze is always needed and I’ve been consuming more than I’ve been collecting and feeling a little guilty. And if I’m sailing to the Black Forest, I might as well skirt some new territory to see if we can find that elusive trader, Haldor, who has yet to show himself. This is my typical session in Valheim– an ever expanding list of things to do, all sparked by desire to accomplish One Simple Thing.

Ok, Tin, Copper, Wood, Berries, a longer sail… This could get time consuming if I have to go back and forth. Enter the Container Freight Solution. In looking on the web for something about Birch and Oak seeds, or lack thereof, I ran across a quick reference to putting a cart on a boat to be able to increase the Karve’s carrying capacity.

Well, if I’m headed out to collect things by boat, this sounds like a great idea to tryout. The first challenge was to get a cart on to the boat.

First attempt, I wheeled the cart down to the dock and scratched my head. A vain attempt to drag it on to the boat from the side failed, so I went with Plan B. Build a platform over the deck, build the cart on the platform, destroy the platform.

Of course, I attempted this at night, but you can see the floor panel with the cart on it as I’m about to destroy the floor.

Success! Platform removed, cart on deck. Time for a shakedown cruise. I wasn’t keen on filling it up until I was reasonably certain it wouldn’t end in complete disaster, so off I went.

The cart seems to get knocked about a bit on deck which is a little disconcerting. The pull shafts seem to get caught up in the sail lines as it pivots with the wind. Still it seems to handle the rough seas fine enough.

Surviving the shakedown cruise, I finally got to the task at hand. I left the boat just a bit off shore because of a nearby troll. There’s always a troll… As soon as I started mining some copper, the troll decided to visit. Troll dispatched, I resumed mining only to hear the sound of crunching coming from the boat. I immediately suspected grey dwarves.

No dwarves. The boat and cart seemed to be having some kind of a tussle and damage figures were floating in the air. At first, I thought perhaps I’d moored too near a submerged rock and the swell was beating the boat on it. When I got on the boat though, it was clear that the cart seemed to be fixed to the landscape while the boat was floating on the water. As a result, the boat was dashing itself against the cart and taking damage.

I couldn’t move the cart, and I couldn’t destroy it, so I finally managed to yank the boat free before it destroyed itself (note the damage in the screenshot below). With the boat out of the way, the cart remained fixed but floating just above the water.

Various attempts ensued to build a platform out to, under and around the cart to either retrieve it or break it down, all to no avail. Finally, I gave up and had to log out for some chores around the house.

To my amazement, when I logged back on, the cart was still there, but this time it was floating in the water so I was able to bump it back to shore and roll it up on to land again.

My plan was to just break it down and continue experiments at a later time. After all, the whole point of this excursion was to get materials for a damned cauldron and 2 hours into it, I was no closer to my goal.

In for a penny, in for a pound, so before I completely gave up on the cart-on-a-boat idea, and thinking of how many land or sea trips it would take to retrieve the ore I just mined, I decided to give one more go.

I built a proper dock with the level of the dock well above the height of the gunwales of the boat. Then I grabbed the cart and just rolled it on to the boat. While far from a precision operation, the extra height was just enough to allow the cart to fall into the boat in suitable fashion. I loaded it up with 800+ pounds of stuff and off I went back to base. While the boat didn’t ride any lower, handling certainly felt more sluggish. I’m assuming the physics engine is still accounting for weight somewhere.

On arrival at my home port, I was confronted with the opposite problem. Do I shuttle all those goods out of the cart on deck or is there another way. Well, at this point, safe at home, I said what the heck, lets try the brute force method first.

I got in the boat, stepped into the control position of the cart, took control and with a mighty tug or three, managed to yank the fully loaded cart off the boat onto the dock. Op success.

From that it was a piece of cake to pull the load up to the crafting area of the base.

Now all I had to do was turn piles of wood into coal, smelt the tin and copper ore, carrying some tin and copper overland to the farm base, build a forge, and then the cauldron so finally, I could make my carrot soup.

Just another typical day in Valheim.

5 thoughts on “Shipping News”

  1. Great read. It’s amazing how these plans spiral out of control, isn’t it?

    One thing, though. I could have sworn neither birch nor oak grows in black forest. I was sure they both only grow in meadows. I’ve had to chop a lot of them for fine wood for portals recently and I always have to go to meadows to do it. Black forest only has fir and pine. Birch does grow in plains but that’s hardly helpful.

    As yet I haven’t made a cart. Not really had any use for one. I ought to do it just to see how they work.

    1. I believe you are right on the Birch, Oak front. More’s the pity for my continuing misadventures… looking for something that isn’t there. Fine wood is definitely gating, although I get it. Despite the inconvenience of having to gather certain items needed to make/upgrade things, it does force you to go out and get into trouble.

      In Minecraft, once I got my basic base set up, I pretty much had a capsule economy within the walls– mines below, villagers within, woodlots, farm and livestock to hand, etc. As satisfying as it was to become self sufficient in nearly all things, the curiosity and need for the outside world diminished, so something was lost. Sometimes, requiring a little daring of your players is a good thing. It certainly results in emergent experiences like we all have been having.

      The cart really is helpful for filling up with lumber to take back to the charcoal kiln. With all of us using the main base as crafting central, we’re blowing through wood at a tremendous pace. Add to it my building propensity and the wood box can never be full enough. The cart really cuts down on the back and forth, even if the timber is just outside the gate (which I replant for continued convenience). My bags are usually so full, I’m lucky to be able to carry more than a full stack of wood at a time, so 18 in a cart at one time is luxury.

    1. You made me have to reload on how to use my screen capture software and Da Vinci Resolve (and that was still faster than the average load time of Premiere Pro, and nothing crashed…).

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